Distrubution Specific Guides

Void Linux: Creating Binary Packages Using xbps-src

May 30, 2018, 6 p.m.

The primary reason I wanted to try Void Linux was for its build system, xbps-src, a complement to Void's binary package management system, XBPS. It can be used to build and install source packages from Void's Github repository or to build and install software made available as source packages from third parties. In this post, I present my experience building two programs that are not available from Void either as binary or source ...

GO TO ARTICLE

openSUSE Tumbleweed [Snapshot 20161204] Nvidia Hybrid Graphics

Jan. 1, 2017, 6 p.m.

Although openSUSE is an excellent distribution in its core design, the project's adherence to certain FOSS principles prevent it from installing proprietary packages by default. This includes packages necessary to enable the proprietary Nvidia drivers through the Nvidia kernel modules. This limitation includes the Nvidia drivers specifically used with the Bumblebee graphics processor switching program. Fortunately, openSUSE provides optional repositories that contain the necessary packages. This article describes how to enable the the full ...

GO TO ARTICLE

Sabayon: Using Portage to Build a Binary Package for Installation by Entropy

Oct. 1, 2015, 6 p.m.

My biggest complaint with Sabayon after using the 14.08 release for more than three months was the lack of a way to get software that is not available in the Sabayon repositories for management by the Entropy binary package management system. There didn't appear to be an easy way to build binary packages from source or from a third party tarball as there is for RPM based distributions through the rpmbuild tool. As ...

GO TO ARTICLE

Sabayon: Converting to Hybrid Source/Binary Package Management System

Oct. 1, 2015, 6 p.m.

After using Sabayon 14.08 for several months, I became increasingly frustrated with the lack of software in Sabayon's repositories which I had become accustomed to being available in other distributions' default repositories. There wasn't even a method for building binary packages from third party or upstream source using a simple tool like rpmbuild for RPM based distributions for installation and management by the system package manager. This article describes one way to ...

GO TO ARTICLE

Booting Arch and Arch Based Distributions with another Distribution's GRUB

May 1, 2015, 6 p.m.

Arch implements the loading of Intel processor microcode updates at boot differently from other distributions. While other distributions include the microcode into the initramfs (the replacement of the initrd) image, Arch leaves this as a separate image, which is loaded by Arch's GRUB at the same time as the initramfs. Because the implementation of GRUB through the scripts in /etc/grub.d/ by other distrubutions doesn't account for this difference, other distributions' GRUB ...

GO TO ARTICLE

NixOS Configuration

May 1, 2015, 6 p.m.

One of the attractive features of NixOS is the ability to declaratively configure all aspects of the system from one configuration file called configuration.nix or for manageability, with this file and input files -- imports in the nix expression terminology --) that are called from this file. Even nix expressions (package build scripts) that can initiate a custom package build, starting from downloading a source tarball to configuring the custom package, can be integrated into this ...

GO TO ARTICLE

Installing Arch from an Existing Linux Installation

May 1, 2015, 6 p.m.

For some people, the typical method of installing Arch -- using the downloaded ISO installation environment, which provides all of the very basic command line tools to install Arch, and manually configuring everything, is more difficulty than they are willing to endure. The most intimidating element of this process being configuring the network during installation. Fortunately, Arch, like any distribution, can be installed by using a chroot environment from an existing Linux installation, greatly simplifying the ...

GO TO ARTICLE

Repository Management in openSUSE

May 1, 2015, 6 p.m.

This article describes how repositories are structured in openSUSE, as well as listing some of the useful repositories not enabled by default at installation, and how to manage repositories using both the zypper tool and the YaST "Software Repositories" module. Although, originally written as a supplement to the openSUSE 13.2 review, it applies to newer versions of openSUSE's regular release as well as openSUSE's rolling release, Tumbleweed.

GO TO ARTICLE